Review: The Vanishing American Adult

I didn’t read Senator Ben Sasse‘s The Vanishing American Adult: Our Coming-of-Age Crisis and How to Rebuild a Culture of Self-Reliance when it initially came out because I was put off by the title. Do we really need another anti-millennial book? And is anyone truly self-reliant in contemporary culture? Moreover, I was reluctant to read yet another politician dictating policy solutions when he has little grasp on those upon whom he is prescribing policy. Indeed, I only picked up the book at the recommendation of my friend, T.K. Small. I’m glad T.K. recommended the book and have since learned not to judge a book by its title (or it’s author’s profession)!

51etAA6pA1L._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

What first impressed me about Sasse was his writing itself. I was not expecting syntax and diction that were pleasant to read; I suppose a stereotype Nebraskans as boring farmers, but Sasse’s style is entertaining. Moreover, it is based in fact; he uses a fine balance of academic literature and personal anecdote to convey information in a well-paced manner.

And, although the beginning of the book does discuss how millennial Americans fail to meet many of the standards of their forbearers, Sasse does not blame millennials for these shortcomings. Rather, he takes the reader through an interesting history of the American education system and the goals of social reformers like John Dewey. As immigrants arrived from various backgrounds and jobs became harder to get, school was a good place to stick new arrivals and provide a standardized baseline. However, education transitioned from the classical toward the pragmatic. More time was continually devoted to the classroom, taking students away from family, the community, and jobs. Learning became a passive endeavor.

Dewey’s student ultimately has no soul. The only thing that matters, in the end, is man’s relation to his society. The societal here and now is the all in all. The goal is expressly not the full flowering of the individual, but rather ‘all education preceded by the participation of the individual in the social consciousness of the race.’

Certainly, other factors contribute to the lack of well-roundedness with which today’s young adults must grapple, but the mere fact that so much of one’s youth is spent in the classroom contributes significantly to the problem.

In the second, and largest, part of the book, Sasse offers concrete ideas for helping youth grow into adulthood. Importantly, none of the five proposals is a policy idea, but instead direct action that parents can take to enrich the lives of their children. He proposes: ensuring that young people spend time with those of a range of ages and experiences; arranging for youth to work; diminishing consumption of material goods; traveling; and sharing great works of literature with young people. Sasse uses his own family’s practices as examples for instituting the above ideas, but also recognizes that implementation will look different for every family. For example, he notes that one need not travel far in order to try one’s hand at navigating, managing a new environment, and participating in new experiences.

I’ve already noted that I was impressed with the book, and believe others would learn from its pages. In particular, I would recommend this book to parents and those who have children in their lives, including aunts, uncles, and mentors.

Review: Dangerous

I really hesitated before purchasing Milo Yiannopoulos DangerousI was afraid of the controversy that reading the book in public might entail. One of my work colleagues and I discussed Milo and his movement after the riot that followed him at Berkeley. Before hearing about the massive damage left in his wake, I had never heard of him, nor read his Breitbart columns. Shortly after the Berkeley incident, Milo made the news again, resigning from Breitbart after allegations that he supported pedophilia. So, you can imagine why I was leery.

It turns out that Milo relishes the spotlight, referring to himself as a “dangerous faggot” and adopting the drag persona Ivana Wall. His book describes the role he’s created for himself, eagerly pushing boundaries and challenging liberals who try to suppress the free speech of himself and others. Milo promises readers that he is a “good troll,” only using “a certain level of disregard for other people’s feelings” when “reasoned argument and polite entreaty have failed.

Nonetheless, in Dangerous, Milo is occasionally downright mean for no apparent purpose, other than getting himself put squarely back in the limelight. Milo regularly complains about “ugly women” and “fat people,” yet claims he only trolls “deserving targets,” including “the disabled.” What did people with disabilities ever do to get on Milo’s bad side? I find his attitude toward people with disabilities particularly ironic given that Milo claims HIV/AIDS is still a problem worthy of attention, particularly amongst the gay male population. Funny that, when the Americans with Disabilities Act was being passed, disability advocates fought tenaciously to get HIV/AIDS recognized as a disability within the Act’s protection.

The surprising thing is that Milo actually has many astute points. Particularly in regard to social media censorship and the millennial generation’s engagement in the political sphere, Milo has many thoughts worthy of discussion. Because I actually learned something from Dangerous – something interesting, I promise, completely aside from name-calling – I feel compelled to recommend that others give the book a chance. At the same time, I understand if and why you don’t. Fortunately, you have to freedom to expose yourself to Milo. (I’m sure he’d get a kick out of it!)

51GWPkjQH4L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Free Our People Film Festival

I got home slightly before midnight, went to work in this morning, and saw the doctor this afternoon. So, you can expect me to be pretty tired. Nonetheless, I have to share how much fun it was participating in the Center for Disability RightsFree Our People Film Festival in Rochester, New York on Tuesday!

In March, my sister, Ginny, and I wrote and produced a seven-minute film, (Crip)perelli Life 2: Home Is Where The Hat Is. The film is a sequel to (Crip)perelli Life, a story about a highschooler with spinal muscular atrophy that joins a Mafia family with similarly disabled people. In the sequel, the highschooler’s service dog racing ring gets busted by the cops, and, without a transition plan in place, he gets stuck living in a nursing home. Members of the Cripperelli family have to bust him out.

Although the movie is satirical, it tackles the important and oft-ignored subject of institutionalization.  In fact, it’s estimated that more than 200,000 non-elderly people currently reside in nursing homes. The Center for Disability Rights sought to bring attention to this topic by sponsoring the Film Festival. Ginny and I came in second place, and had the pleasure of attending the Film Festival in person.

20638011_335773206862999_6188612756733319083_n.jpg
Ginny introducing our production

In addition to watching the winning and third-place videos, the Center for Disability Rights showed a couple of other videos highlighting the terrible consequences of institutionalization. A filmmaker panel concluded the evening, as members of the audience got to ask questions about the films and other disability advocacy projects.

I was privileged to participate in the Film Festival, and encourage anyone reading this blog to check out each of the short films. You will laugh and definitely learn something.  Center for Disability Rights CEO Bruce Darling also committed to promoting a similar Film Festival next year, so keep visiting the website throughout the year if you want more information on how you can participate!

Banishing Bumpiness

Are you a wheelchair user? Do you experience back or neck pain? If so, you’re not alone. Today I listened to a Great Lakes ADA Center webinar on Surface Roughness and Rollability. I was surprised to learn that wheelchair users are twice as likely as the general population to suffer back and neck pain. In fact, 60% of wheelchair users report such soreness. Some of this discomfort may be attributed to vibrations caused by rolling over uneven pathways.

Uneven pathways are bad all around. Presenter Jon Pearlman shared that $30 billion is annually spent on medical costs associated with falls. The elderly population is especially susceptible to tripping. Falls also are the most common cause of traumatic brain injuries. If wheelchairs – and especially scooters – go over particularly uneven pathways, people sitting in them may fall out. Bad, bad, bad!

Dr. Pearlman and his team discovered that, regardless of the wheelchair brand/model, vibrations measured in wheelchair seats that are driven over pathways fall either within or above the vibration caution zone delineated by OSHA. So how do we minimize this danger?

Unfortunately, DME companies have not worked to resolve the problem. Studies reveal that wheelchair cushions actually amplify vibrations into the spinal column of the wheelchair user. Suspension systems are not sufficient, either. However, to create an adequate suspension system for the level of vibration typically experienced by a wheelchair user, the wheelchair would likely become unwieldy.

The solution, then, appears to lie in the proper design of pathways themselves. Surprisingly, Dr. Pearlman reports that some paving stones create smoother pathways than poured concrete. The pattern and bevel of the paver stones are determinative of the vibrations wheelchair users will experience. Municipalities, which are typically responsible for creating pedestrian paths, should take heed of Dr. Pearlman’s data when planning new projects.

Interestingly, the US Access Board funded a portion of Dr. Pearlman’s research. My hope, as a cobblestone-hating wheelchair user, is that the Access Board will develop standards requiring minimum smoothness.

Access and Inclusion Awards

Last Tuesday, I attended the annual Mayor’s Advisory Council on Disability‘s Access and Inclusion Awards. (As for this post, better late than never, right?) This ceremony did not occur last year because the Mayor’s Office was considering merging these awards with other diversity award ceremonies. But, thanks to relentless advocacy from Councilmember Paula Haskin, Mayor Hogsett agreed to a 2017 program.

20246382_1703093743318829_3216696674764224122_n.jpg

The ceremony began with a few words from the Mayor. His speech was geared toward empowerment and appreciation for the 27 years of continuing advocacy people with disabilities have made. His referring to a person in a wheelchair as “wheelchair-bound” was a minor blunder. For those who are unaware, “wheelchair-bound” is a disfavored phrase by many who use wheelchairs. We see wheelchairs not as something we are stuck in, but rather as tools of freedom. It was a teachable moment.

20369008_1703536526607884_1409083705076763274_o.jpg

Awards were received by the following individuals:

  • Scott Wise, owner of Scotty’s Brewhouse, won the award for being an employer offering opportunities to people with disabilities.
  • Indy Pride won for being a community organization going above and beyond to include individuals with disabilities in its programming.
  • Wade Wingler, of Easter Seals Crossroads, won the lifetime achievement award in honor of a life of service to individuals with disabilities.

Disability Rights March

Today I attended a disability rights March in Indianapolis sponsored by the Global Accessibility Project. Those who turned out – on a hot day that threatened thunderstorms – both with and without disabilities, are committed to promoting disability rights. A guy from Iowa even stopped by and joined us for a while, sharing that he stood in solidarity with our frustrations about the lack of inclusion of people with disabilities in the broader social justice landscape.

20228370_297628520710894_5963401881975472821_n.jpg
Photo credit: Global Accessibility Project

As we marched around Indiana’s Statehouse and Government Center, numerous accessibility fails were witnessed:

  • Our permit was for gathering on the south lawn of the Statehouse. It’s impossible to get there without climbing stairs.
  • To enter the Statehouse, those who cannot climb stairs are required to enter in the back, via the basement.
  • Accessible parking is nowhere near the accessible entrances of either building.
  • Flower planters are placed about one foot from the edge of the curb where those using accessible parking are required to parallel park. This makes it impossible for those using the parking spaces to deploy ramps or lifts.
  • One ramp was ridiculously steep, clearly outside Access Board requirements.
  • Many ramps were in poor repair, with potholes at the edges.
  • One ramp was completely inaccessible, as construction materials covered it. There was no opportunity to detour, as construction cones were dumped in the possible detour pathway.

Think that’s a lot of problems? We walked less than two blocks! Perhaps some of our frustration can now be understood…

Review: An American Sickness

You know by now that I love reading and sharing information that I learn from a good book. Elisabeth Rosenthal‘s An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back is truly one of the most interesting books I’ve read all year! Especially now, as Senators discuss repealing and/or amending the Affordable Care Act, read this book!!!

410kNvpsHYL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Rosenthal, a former journalist and physician, begins by thoroughly describing how the medical-industrial complex takes advantage of patients and legal loopholes. She devotes a chapter each to the ills of insurers, hospitals, physicians, pharmaceutical companies, medical device companies, ancillary service providers, billing and coding contractors, medical researchers, conglomerations, and patient complacency. The facts presented are fascinating: for example, “[t]he average hospital cost per day in the United States was $4,300 in 2013,” more than triple “the cost in Australia and about ten times the cost in Spain”!

The concept that irked me the most is “venture philanthropy.” Of it, Rosenthal writes:

The problem is that many charitable foundations no longer see themselves as funders of research for knowledge propelled by donor dollars to cure a disease, but instead as inventors in new treatments.

When insulin was developed in the 1920s, researchers did not stand by patent protection to reap income, but instead shared their knowledge with the community. When the March of Dimes helped fund vaccination research, it did not bill children or their families for inoculation. Now, medical charities are investing money in research. Because any successful discovery will likely result in royalties to the charity shareholder, the charity has no financial incentive to advocate for the cost of that discovery to be accessible to those served by the charity. Talk about conflict of interest!

Rosenthal devotes the second portion of the book to offering both systemic reform, as well as individualized, methods to save money on medical treatment. Again, this section was disturbing, given that neither Republicans nor Democrats are proposing many of the reforms proposed by Rosenthal. Although concepts like tort reform have been initiated in states like Indiana, contemporary federal reform efforts appear completely off the mark.

Last, but most certainly not least, the end of the book contains multiple appendices patients can use to arm themselves in price negotiation. Although options for comparison shopping for medical procedures are limited, Rosenthal provides links to those options that are available. She also includes template letters patients can use when objecting to healthcare charges.

This book contains good stuff, all around. I’ve been bugging my coworkers about it all week long, eager to share stories about how we are all getting ripped off. This book, however, is not a ripoff, but a real gem for the bookshelf!