Review: Rising Star

Earlier this week I finally finished David J. Garrow’s Rising Star: The Making of Barack Obama. I say finally for a few reasons. The book is so long – my e-book, in regular typeface, was about 2,000 pages – and so detailed that it reminded me of War and Peace. In fact, the first chapter opens with 1970s Chicago, well before Obama ever set foot there. And it contains so many different characters that it’s difficult to keep everyone straight. Nonetheless, Garrow effectively shows the inner war and peace Obama encountered on his path to the presidency.

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Those who read Obama’s Dreams From My Father are familiar with the gist of Obama’s background. His mother is a white American and his father was a black Kenyan.  Neither parent was physically present for the majority of Obama’s childhood, and he was raised by his maternal grandparents after living with his mother and stepfather for several years in Indonesia. Obama describes himself, in his autobiography, as someone searching for identity and place.

Garrow unravels the vignettes written by Obama, and digs much deeper into Obama’s past.  While many of Obama’s Hawaiian friends from childhood remembered him as a smart and laid-back individual, Obama’s book doesn’t necessarily portray the same, but instead describes racial conflict. Garrow, instead, posits that Obama actually became more aware of racial conflict and identity while at Occidental College.  It was then that Obama ceased allowing friends to call him “Barry,” and became “Barack.” It was then that he chose his identity as black (rather than someone of multiple ethnicities.)

Another fascinating portion of the book follows Obama’s relationship with Sheila Jager. Garrow suggests that Obama ultimately broke up with Jager because Obama believed that he could not successfully run for higher political office unless he developed ties in the African-American community by marrying a woman from the same. Michelle Robinson filled that role perfectly. (And Michelle Obama did all that she could to keep her husband from running for office, believing politics was beneath his talents.)

I would recommend this book to anyone interested in learning more about President Obama, Chicago politics, or campaigning. While the book focuses on both the personal and the political, the personal accounts, gleaned through interviews Obama’s friends and relations, were the most interesting. They provide insight into the motivations of a man that led America for eight years.

Bound and Gagged?

Yesterday evening, a terrible story broke: a white 18-year-old, described as “having mental health challenges,” was kidnapped in a stolen van by four African-American young people and tortured. The victim was sworn at (“fuck white people” and “fuck Donald Trump”), physically assaulted until he bled, and forced to drink toilet water over a period between 24 and 48 hours. It’s difficult to imagine, but for the actual footage the assailants broadcasted on Facebook. Absolutely sickening.

You’d think that organized minority groups, and justice arms of the government, would come out strong against this behavior. After all, these are the entities that clamor for hate crimes legislation and are supporting one another on the eve of Trump’s assuming office. I expected to go on my own Facebook account and see my liberal friends sharing the story, condemning the unjustifiable behavior of the assailants that demonstrably victimized someone on the basis of his disability and his race. To date, only one of my 900+ Facebook  friends registered as a Democrat has expressed disgust at the story.

Okay, I reasoned. My friend who posted the story is a fellow disability rights attorney. Maybe people simply haven’t heard about the victim and his torture. Not so. I believe they simply fail to see the depravity in the actions. Why? CNN host Don Lemon plainly stated – and then repeated – “I don’t think it’s evil.” Police Commander Kevin Duffin stated, “Kids make stupid mistakes.”

So… Because the perpetrators hated Trump, like their liberal comrades, taking a disabled man, binding and gagging him, and torturing him for hours upon hours, their actions might be justified? Or, at least, understandable? Fathomable? Logical? This boggles my mind!

Speak out, liberal friends. Unlike this tragic victim, you’ve not been bound and gagged – use your voice and condemn this violence!