Review: Crippled America

Yup. I did it. After weeks of hemming and hawing about whether I should read it, I finally picked it up. Blame it on the fact that I was stuck in a hotel room for four hours with nothing else to do or blame me for not resisting the title. Either way, I have digested Donald Trump‘s Crippled America: How to Make America Great Again.

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As I recently joked in an MSNBC article, I was initially excited about the tome. Was a presidential candidate actually devoting an entire book to disability policy? Would we finally have a comprehensive long-term care program? New incentives for employers to hire people with disabilities? Of course, no such luck.

Crippled America is classic Trump. In fact, the first few pages of the book are actually devoted to discussing Trump’s portrait on the cover. He explains why he chose to scowl rather than smile. He also repeats things again and again and again – especially why he is a winner. But, if the reader can get past the self-praise with a few eye rolls, the book is not a complete bore.

Trump has received much criticism about his supposed lack of nuance and policy detail. Crippled America does answer some substantive policy questions. For example, readers learn which tax rates Trump would like to see enacted, in addition to the two tax loopholes he is in favor of keeping. Readers will also get a better understanding of Trump’s healthcare ideas (or admitted lack thereof). Trump explains that he has evolved from believing a universal payor system best, but is open to hearing from experts regarding what type of plan should replace Obamacare.

Because people should be voting in November, I do recommend they read this book to better understand Trump the candidate. I can’t say it’s “fun” or academically challenging, but it is important.

Indiana Primary and the Traveling Board

Thus far, I’ve been mum about the Indiana primary coming up on Tuesday. This  election season has been strange, turbulent, and intense. I’ve been hesitant to “endorse” any candidate, partially because I don’t want to be accused of racism, stupidity, or any other negative label I don’t believe truly applies. It’s also the case that no candidate particularly supports the comprehensive package of policies I believe is in American interests. Nevertheless, I did choose a Republican presidential candidate and cast my vote for him yesterday.

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Now, politics aside, my absence from this blog for the last several weeks is due to the fact that I broke my femur and radius on April 16. (Putting together comprehensible sentences is tough, whether the painkillers have kicked in or I’m dealing with the pain.) I began freaking out, worried about getting to my polling place with a ridiculous leg immobilizer. Fortunately, I found out about the Traveling Board.

Of course, voters that cannot go to their polling place have several options.  Many counties permit people to vote early, sometimes at multiple satellite voting locations. Another popular option is the absentee ballot, which I used to vote when studying for a semester in DC in college. However, both of these options are tough for me – I need transportation to an early voting site, and I need a trusted individual to stick my absentee ballot in the mailbox before the deadline. The Traveling Board is an awesome option because people bring the ballot to your home and take it back with them.

A gentlemen and lady came to my home at the scheduled time – 4 PM, right on the dot – and brought a clipboard, ballot, and pen. They helped me position the ballot just where I needed it and were quite nice. In fact, they even brought me a sticker for voting!

I hope my fellow Hoosiers all vote this Tuesday. With the range of options available to us, there are no excuses for escaping your civic duty!

The Left Advocates Discrimination on Basis of Disability

Last week Indiana Governor Mike Pence signed House Enrolled Act 1337 into law. Pro-abortion advocates on the left instantly began howling that Pence, a cold-hearted Republican, is encroaching on women’s rights. However, many of the same advocates refused to acknowledge that the Act forbids discrimination on the basis of disability. Indiana Code 16-31-2-1.1(1)(K) now provides:

That Indiana does not allow a fetus to be aborted solely because of the fetus’s race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or diagnosis or any potential diagnosis of the fetus having Down syndrome or any other disability.

Those on the left argue that Pence and fellow Republicans are using these protected classes to further their agenda, without actually caring for members of those classes. To their credit, I don’t know that parents traditionally opt for abortion based on factors like ancestry. However, mothers do regularly abort fetuses with diagnosed disability.

The numbers are startling. For example, 87% of fetuses diagnosed with Down syndrome are aborted.  Another site puts the number at 92%.  If this is not obvious discrimination against the disability community, I don’t know what is. And I am horrified that local disability organizations are more interested in pushing a liberal agenda then celebrating steps taken by the General Assembly to reject eugenic ideals.

Many expect that the new law will not stand up to judicial scrutiny. We shall see.  But I am jubilant that Indiana, the first state to adopt eugenics laws, is now on the forefront of protecting disabled fetuses. (I’m experiencing a bit of schadenfreude, too, now that liberals have been cornered into choosing which traditional voting block – e.g., fertile women or people with disabilities – to which they will pander.)