Independent Living, Hoosier Style

I’ve spent the last two days in a training program for the Indiana Statewide Council on Independent Living  Council (INSILC). We had the pleasure of being trained Paula McElwee, our technical assistance coordinator from Independent Living Research Utilization (ILRU), and Kimberly Tissot from able South Carolina. The information conveyed by Paula and Kimberly was well-received by INSILC members and prospective members, myself included.

What I did find concerning, however, was confirmation from individuals across the state that many people – both with and without disabilities – are still unfamiliar the philosophy of independent living. I want to devote this post to spreading the word. Independent living is essential, especially as fears loom about political plans for re-institutionalization.

Independent living is generally considered the brainchild of Ed Roberts. Roberts was paralyzed from polio, and used a respirator and an iron lung for respiratory support. Nonetheless, he knew that he had much to contribute, and applied for services from vocational rehabilitation (VR). VR decided that he was too disabled and turned him away without assistance, effectually deeming him unemployable. Roberts pressed on, undeterred, and was admitted to Berkeley. There, Roberts lived in the campus clinic, as opposed to a dormitory, and his brother provided personal care assistance.

As more students with physical disabilities gained admission to Berkeley and forged friendships with Roberts, their band became known as the Rolling Quads. They demanded more equal treatment from Berkeley, including the removal of environmental barriers and the provision of personal care services. Yes, their goal was to live independently. Although they could not “independently” complete the physical tasks of activities of daily living, their independence came through the direction of how those activities were completed. Independence is about choice.

(By the way, in case you were wondering, after Roberts completed his education, he was appointed by the Governor as VR Director. Mwahahahahaha!)

With prompting from those in the disability community, the federal government began funding what are known as centers for independent living (CILs). Today, the funding scheme is fairly complex, but CILs are tasked with providing core services for people with disabilities in their service areas:

  • Information and referral. Staff can refer clients to local community resources such as transportation, accessible and affordable housing options, sources for durable medical equipment, etc.
  • Advocacy. Staff can help clients learn methods for self-advocacy, such as best practices for asking an employer for reasonable accommodations. Staff may also engage in systems advocacy, informing policymakers about the ways in which proposed legislation may affect people with disabilities.
  • Independent living skills. Staff can provide instruction on things like personal care assistance, accessible transportation options, adaptive sports, etc. Obviously, the skills imparted to clients will depend on each client’s individualized needs.
  • Peer counseling. Since many CIL staff have disabilities themselves, they can provide clients with insights about their own experiences. Learning from an experienced peer can demonstrate that independent living, holding a job, etc., is possible, regardless of what the client has heard elsewhere.
  • Transition. Staff can help clients transitioning from high school to higher education or the workforce. Important tips, such as getting a benefits analysis and exploring Medicaid buy-in options, can be very helpful to those transitioning into adulthood.

Important stuff, no doubt. Although the day-to-day operations of the CILs are largely autonomous, the state independent living council in each state is responsible for drafting a state plan for independent living. This plan, which incorporates feedback from people with disabilities, CILs, and community partners, directs the overall operation of independent living within the state. The drafting and monitoring of this plan are primary responsibilities for councils, including INSILC.

Crucially, INSILC is the only gubernatorially-appointed board in Indiana that contains a majority of people with disabilities as voting members, with a consistent mission of promoting independent living within the state. They are, most certainly, a necessary voice. The past two days’ training sessions were great; it makes me happy to see INSILC’s commitment to continue striving to represent the interests of peers with disabilities.

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